How to Mix Metallics

White Bathroom with Metallic Decor

Image: Kreyv

Raise your hand if you remember when there was a hard fast rule about mixing metallics. The rule was DON’T. If you were committed to polished brass in your house, you were committed 100%. Every doorknob, hinge, lighting fixture, drawer pull, and faucet had to be a gorgeous shade of flamboyant gold.

Luckily for us that is not the case anymore. Design rules like ‘don’t mix metallics’ are being thrown out of the window and replaced with much looser guidelines and standards. Mixing metallic is where people can get hung up. When something is permanently etched into your design subconscious it can be hard to change it up.

I am in love with these rooms; they take a little from here, and a little from there, and create a magic metallic recipe.

Kitchen


Image: The Roof Over My Head

Kitchens and bathrooms are where people have the hardest time giving up the match. Look at how beautiful the kitchen below is. All of the brass lighting and hardware make the room feel warm, but also take note of the high polish nickel on the faucet. Can you imagine how much more sterile the room would feel if the worn brass was replaced with nickel?

Home Office


Image: houzz

When you are working with metallics, don’t forget the industrial styles. Worn stainless steel and powder coated pipe are great metallics that make a space feel really vintage and used.

So tell me, what is your favorite metallic mix? Are you still against mixing?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Solve : *
27 − 10 =


About The Author

Profile Photo
Mandi Gubler
Mandi Gubler is a DIY/Shelter Blogger known for her fearless approach to all things Do It Yourself. She is a self proclaimed thrift store junkie, craigslist stalker (not the killing kind) and garage sale maven. Mandi started her blog Vintage Revivals in July 2010 with zero DIY/Design experience. She apparently had a hidden talent that once released, not only changed her life but inspires millions. Mandi's approach to design is simple. She believes that true style has the chance to emerge when you stop worrying about what everyone else is doing, will think, or might say, and do what makes your guts grin.