Backyard Bungalows: Studio Spaces That Fit in Your Backyard

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Image: inthralld

In my constant search for the perfect workspace I’ve started daydreaming about having a small studio in the back yard where I can go to get away from it all. Hmmm… Sounds less like an alternate office and more like a staycation destination, doesn’t it? Well, either way, I’ve collected a few outstanding examples of backyard bungalows that have caught my fancy. One of my favorites is the stunning studio shown above—adapted from a shipping container and full of function.

Hybrid

Back house
Image: Dezeen

Designed to be big enough for one individual to live in, this high-concept backyard building seems like a toolshed/lunar landing module hybrid. I can just picture it perched on long stilts as if ready to walk across the landscape. Have my daydreams lapsed into boyhood astronautical aspirations? It sure would make retreating in this small space fun.

Inspired

Home Office
Image: Sett Studio

The terrific small space that Sett Studio has to offer is a tiny beauty of modern design and inspiration. Everything anyone would need for a relaxing backyard bungalow is included; plus, there are plenty of ways to customize for your own needs.

Permanent

Outdoor Office
Image: Johnsen Schmaling Architects

A separate studio space doesn’t have to be tiny if you have the square footage for it. This one is no prefab or adaptation; it’s a permanent structure featuring some of my favorite materials: steel, glass and concrete. With that strip of lighting at the base, this is a real architectural gem and a worthy addition to any back yard.

Modular

Modular Office
Image: Dwell

The ultimate in flexibility, these three units can be arranged to function as separate small pavilions or brought together in a variety of ways to make one, two, or three spaces. Very creative and very modern—the kind of thing that used to only be real in daydreams can now be yours.

Do you have a backyard building that you use for work or escape?

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Dave Hime, founder/curator of JapaneseTrash.com, has been an interior design addict for as long as he can remember. In 2005, he bought a house-in-progress and missed several opportunities to have an influence on his own home decor–leaving him wanting more. With design heroes such as Blake Dollahite (ruraltheory.com) and Robert & Cortney Novogratz (thenovogratz.com), Dave began seeking out online resources that would exemplify the interior design practices he's most drawn to: using color, texture and simple materials well. Bringing all of this together, along with his specific focus on providing interior design inspiration from a man's point of view, is Dave's mission: masculine design.