Dancing on the Ceiling: Rooms That Use Flooring Materials on the Ceiling

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Image: Andy Liffner on Remodelista

My favorite home décor styles have a few things in common—individuality, creativity, and personality. Other than that, I don’t tend to think there should be a lot of rules about how you decorate your own space. However, a terrific ceiling usually fits one of two criteria in my book: either it completely disappears, or it acts as a focal point. With that thought in mind, let’s take a look at some examples of inspiring ceilings—specifically ones that use materials usually reserved for the floor.

Wood

Dancing on the Ceiling: Rooms That Use Flooring Materials on the Ceiling

Image: Sukio

This example uses beautifully crafted and stained wood on the ceiling to dress up the room. I assume it’s purely decorative, and would be a fairly simple addition to an existing space, should you want to try this in your own home.

Concrete

Dancing on the Ceiling: Rooms That Use Flooring Materials on the Ceiling

Image: Roger D’Souza for Dwell

Concrete ceilings remind me of the Paul Simon song “One Man’s Ceiling Is Another Man’s Floor.” This was likely a structural element in the building, but it’s one that most would cover up. I’m a big fan of leaving the raw cement here.

Subway Tile

Dancing on the Ceiling: Rooms That Use Flooring Materials on the Ceiling

Image: timticks

This seems like a natural extension of the existing wall tile, but adding it to the ceiling is an unusual and striking choice.

Stained Plywood

Dancing on the Ceiling: Rooms That Use Flooring Materials on the Ceiling

Plywood in and of itself is a non-traditional choice for the ceiling, but the unique stain also resembles the sky. This choice shows real individuality, creativity, and personality.

How would you show personality through your ceilings?

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Dave Hime, founder/curator of JapaneseTrash.com, has been an interior design addict for as long as he can remember. In 2005, he bought a house-in-progress and missed several opportunities to have an influence on his own home decor–leaving him wanting more. With design heroes such as Blake Dollahite (ruraltheory.com) and Robert & Cortney Novogratz (thenovogratz.com), Dave began seeking out online resources that would exemplify the interior design practices he's most drawn to: using color, texture and simple materials well. Bringing all of this together, along with his specific focus on providing interior design inspiration from a man's point of view, is Dave's mission: masculine design.