The Extended Version: Add-Ons to Homes That Bring New Life

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Image: James Knowler for Dwell

One of my favorite décor mashups is when modern and traditional – and by traditional, I mean era-specific designs like Victorian – come together to create something brand new and exciting. The same is true for a well-planned home extension, whether it brings differing styles together or not.

Though you can’t see the gingerbread filigrees of the original 1880's bungalow above, I’ll bet you can imagine the sense of open spaciousness that this glass and steel structure brings to the home. It’s this literal breakthrough from an older way of living that makes modern architectural extension work.

From McMansion to Marvelous

Home Extension With Glass Wall
Image: dezeen

You can see a glimpse of the original theme-park like façade of the home above, and from that glimpse you can imagine the rest. By blasting through the brick walls and tiny windows and replacing them with glass walls to bring the outside in, this extension completely transforms this house for the better.

A-Frame Plus

A-Frame Extension
Image: Frederik Vercruysse for Dwell

Of course, additional space is a result of any home extension, and when the original structure’s footprint is as tiny as this A-frame, that can be a big plus.

Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Rear Home Extension With Glass Wall
Image: Fernando Guerra for Archinect

This extension completely transforms the rear façade of a brick row house. Not only does it bring the design firmly into the present, but it also provides space and clean architecture to confidently take it into the future. This, to me, is one of the best examples of bringing new life to a traditional space.

Inside and Out

Home Extension With Fireplace
Image: Dwell

This row house extension serves double duty. It not only expands and modernizes the indoor space, but the addition of the outdoor fireplace also creates new room for entertaining. Brilliant.

Does your home need an extension to help bring it new life?

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Dave Hime, founder/curator of JapaneseTrash.com, has been an interior design addict for as long as he can remember. In 2005, he bought a house-in-progress and missed several opportunities to have an influence on his own home decor–leaving him wanting more. With design heroes such as Blake Dollahite (ruraltheory.com) and Robert & Cortney Novogratz (thenovogratz.com), Dave began seeking out online resources that would exemplify the interior design practices he's most drawn to: using color, texture and simple materials well. Bringing all of this together, along with his specific focus on providing interior design inspiration from a man's point of view, is Dave's mission: masculine design.