The Off-Screen Work of On-Screen Designers: 4 Looks You Have Never Seen on TV

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Jeff Lewis
Images: Jeff Lewis Design

If you’re like me and enjoy watching interior design television, you probably have some favorites. Those designers seem to make some of the worst spaces look amazing, but I often wonder what kinds of things they get into when working outside the framework of television design.

Jeff Lewis

In addition to the multiple TV shows featuring Jeff Lewis, he is active on the speaking circuit, has his own line of interior paint, and provides interior design services to private clients. In 2010, he was selected by House Beautiful to design their Kitchen of the Year, shown above.

Nate Berkus

Nate Berkus Design

Nate Berkus
Images: (Top) Nate Berkus, (Bottom) George Burns/Harpo Studios

After rising to fame on “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” Nate Berkus continued his 15-year career working with his firm’s interior design clients creating relaxed, livable spaces like the living room above. Along with that, he also wrote two successful books, starred in his own talk show, and developed an eponymous line of goods for Target. He was also an executive producer of the film, The Help.

Anthony Carrino and John Colenari

Brunelleschi Construction

Anthony Carrino John Colaneri
Images: (Top) Brunelleschi Construction, (Bottom) HGTV.com

Known for their shows “Kitchen Cousins” and “Cousins on Call”, Anthony Carrino and John Colenari also work in the family owned construction and renovation business. Specializing in urban mixed-use and adaptive re-use, the firm has taken on multiple renovation projects such as the conversion of a former fire station into their business location. The double sink shown above is from a brownstone renovation/conversion where they created four condo units – great use of warm brown tones in this space.

Roger Hazard

Roger Hazard Design

Roger Hazard
Images: (Top) Chris Stout on Curbed, (Bottom) A&E

Having been off the air for a time, Roger Hazard still has a tremendous number of design projects in the works. Along with his work for a national cabinetry firm, he is leading the renovation of his own Victorian in upstate New York and has a thriving furniture design and manufacturing shop. Oh, and he still works with private clients, too; this living room is a great example of his relaxed style.

What are some of the off-screen projects of your favorite television interior designers?

1 Comment

  1. This was great!

    Thanks also for reminding me of Roger Hazard. I couldn’t remember his name after reading about him a few years ago (maybe on Apartment Therapy). I just went to his site and I’m watching his show. Always a pleasure to see designers come alive from the page and photograph.

    Take care,

    Ivan
    Ivan Chan Studio

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Dave Hime, founder/curator of JapaneseTrash.com, has been an interior design addict for as long as he can remember. In 2005, he bought a house-in-progress and missed several opportunities to have an influence on his own home decor–leaving him wanting more. With design heroes such as Blake Dollahite (ruraltheory.com) and Robert & Cortney Novogratz (thenovogratz.com), Dave began seeking out online resources that would exemplify the interior design practices he's most drawn to: using color, texture and simple materials well. Bringing all of this together, along with his specific focus on providing interior design inspiration from a man's point of view, is Dave's mission: masculine design.