Author Archives: Brad Torchia

About Brad Torchia

Brad Torchia is a Denver-based editorial and commercial photographer with a passion for creating honest portraiture. His client list includes The New York Times, Oracle, and Topo Designs. His work can be found at www.bradtorchiaphoto.com.

Storytelling Through Portraiture

As a photographer, my biggest interest, and the majority of my work revolves around portraiture. Much of this stems from a curiosity and desire to hear and understand the unique stories of people around me.

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I’m fascinated by the small events and decisions that happen on a daily basis, but lead to huge changes in the trajectory of our lives. Through meeting and photographing people, we have the ability to peer into this process and gain an important understanding of the differences between us.

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Subtle differences in a subject’s expression, body language, and the space they take up in the frame, along with a photographer’s compositional choices, light, and color all help the viewer to make a connection with the portrait and learn something about the subject.

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Through the process of creating, as well as looking at portraits, I think we can begin to both communicate and understand important human narratives and on a thin level, establish relationships with the faces being photographed.


Channeling A Constant Source Of Inspiration

Paying attention to the world around you can be a great way to draw inspiration into your life and bring fresh ideas into your home.

Everyone has a unique way of seeing, and understanding your distinct eye and what is aesthetically interesting to you can help develop your individual style.

As a photographer I’ve grown to be hyper-aware of small details around me, and through capturing light, color, space, and texture, I’ve found that small differences in these elements can have a large impact on my mood and feelings.  With this in mind, I believe that we can take what makes us feel relaxed and comfortable or bold and focused, and use this as inspiration in designing the spaces we spend the most time in.

Over the course of a few weeks, make an effort to hone in on details that would normally go unnoticed in your daily life.  Pull out your phone and keep a running notebook of images from the surroundings that make you stop. In the end, see what underlying similarities you can pull from these photos and how you can utilize these elements in your house or workspace.